Apple Plum Crumble

 

plums 005We have a plum tree in the yard.  It produces beautiful prune plums that looks like this.  I’m not much of a baker but when the ingredients are in your back yard – how can you resist? There was not a high yield of fruit, just enough for one thing, Old Fashioned Plum and Apple Crumble. A fruit crumble or crisp is about the easiest desserts you can make and it is comforting and delicious served warm with some good vanilla ice cream.

Apple Plum Crumble

Ingredients

  • 4 cups sliced pitted plums
  • 2 cups sliced peeled apples
  • ¼ – 1/3 cup packed brown sugar or other sweetener, adjust depending on sweetness of fruit.
  • 2 tbsp all-purpose flour
  • 1/8 tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

 Crumble:

  • 1 cup large-flake rolled oats
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup packed brown sugar
  • ¼ – ½  tsp cinnamon (to taste)
  • 1 Pinch salt
  • 1/3 cup butter, cubed

 Preparation

Preheat oven to 350°F In large bowl, toss together the sliced fruit with sugar, flour, nutmeg and cinnamon; spread in lightly greased 8-inch (2 L) square glass baking dish. Crumble: In bowl, combine rolled oats, flour, brown sugar, cinnamon and salt. With fingers or pastry blender, rub or cut in butter until mixture is in coarse crumbs. Sprinkle evenly over plum mixture. Bake in 350°F (180°C) oven until topping is golden, and it is bubbly about 50 minutes.

 

Arthritis Kitchen Tip:

This recipe is loaded with cinnamon.  Cinnamon is an antioxidant, thins your blood and can reduce inflammation in the body.  Adding as little as 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon to your daily diet is all that it takes to obtain health benefits.

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About arthritiskitchen

Welcome to the Kitchen! I'm a passionate home cook who loves to work with real ingredients and use food to promote health. I like to write about and take pictures of food and share them with you along my journey. I also have RA - Rheumatoid Auto Immune Disease. My cooking is often focused on using ingredients that reduce inflammation and promote general health. Join me in the kitchen.

Posted on August 26, 2013, in Anti-imflammatory ingredients, Foods Known to Help Arthritis, Recipes / Cooking. Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Thank you for what looks a lovely crumble. I look forward to making it when plums are next in season down-under.

    I spent many years fighting RA, and I finally succeeded by completely changing the foods I ate, and using a variety of supplements. Eventually even my joint deformities were reabsorbed. But it was a long lonely day-by-day battle to achieve all this. Year by year the improvements came though sometimes it seemed like one step forward, two back. However if I don’t keep up my discipline I can quite easily slide back into the old symptoms and sufferings which goes to show just how deep-seated our auto-immune issues can be.

    The important thing is to maintain a bright spirit whatever the cost, and to move forward with hope in our hearts and good clean foods to nourish and heal us as we journey through our lives.

    Before I go off this page I’d like to add a few words about cinnamon.

    It’s helpful for anyone whose trying to regain their health to use the SRI LANKEN (CEYLON) type of cinnamon as opposed to the Indonesian or Chinese varieties. The latter are ‘Cassia’ type cinnamons and contain a large amount of a plant chemical called COUMARIN which can cause liver and kidney damage.

    The much healthier Sri Lanken variety can usually be sourced organically in sticks which you grind down yourself in a coffee or spice grinder. It is the one to take if using it therapeutically every day. I get mine in an organic food store but it may be more convenient to seek it out online.

    On this page there is a picture which helps distinguish between the Cassia form of cinnamon and the Ceyon-Sri Lanken form:

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/260430.php

    There you can see how the Sri Lanken type when you look at it end-on is like a many-layered scroll whereas the Indonesian-Chinese type is much thicker bark without the scroll effect. The good Sri Lanken type is easily breakable so grinds well in the spice grinder, whereas the Indonesian-Chinese cinnamon bark is almost like concrete, unbreakable, and ungrindable without professional equipment.

    As a first time visitor I look forward now to exploring and enjoying your site.

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